Rosa Parks papers give insight into the civil rights icon

Parks acknowledges admirers from a United Air Lines
Parks acknowledges admirers from a United Air Lines jetway in Seattle in 1956. (Photo: Gil Baker)

WASHINGTON – The mother of the modern civil rights movement received a Congressional Gold Medal and the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and was sought out by world leaders, popes and politicians as a symbol of quiet resistance and strength. A statue of her stands in the U.S. Capitol.

But Rosa Parks also had a recipe for featherlight pancakes. She liked to jot prayers that would come to her on slips of paper, or on the back of church bulletins.

For most of her life, she kept a handful of letters from a classmate who moved away when they were girls — the two gossiping in them about boys and their studies.  Read More

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